First Wednesdays: The History of Genre Painting

First Wednesdays: The History of Genre Painting

First Wednesdays: The History of Genre Painting

James Maroney, former head of American Paintings at Sotheby’s and Christie’s, will discuss genre painting – the portrayal of people engaged in everyday activities — in a talk at First Congregational Church in Manchester, Vt. on March 5 at 7 p.m. His talk, ‘Painting Ordinary People,’ is part of the Vermont Humanities Council’s First Wednesdays lecture series and is free and open to the public. Genre painting has roots in both portraiture and history painting, and emerged in the late 18th century as a composite of those two styles. Maroney’s talk will trace the development of genre painting from its beginning in the 1790s through its heyday in the 1840s, to its demise in the twentieth century. Maroney is an independent art dealer, organic dairy farmer and farm advocate living in Vermont. He is past head of American Paintings at both Christie’s and Sotheby’s, N.Y. He is a graduate of Columbia University.

The Vermont Humanities Council’s First Wednesdays series is held on the first Wednesday of every month from October through May in nine communities statewide, featuring speakers of national and regional renown. Talks in Manchester are held at First Congregational Church (unless otherwise noted) and are hosted by Mark Skinner Library. All First Wednesdays talks are free and open to the public.

For more information, contact Mark Skinner Library at 802-362-2607 or the Vermont Humanities Council at 802-262-2626 or [email protected], or visit vermonthumanities.org.

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