Norman Rockwell Museum Presents Trains! A Family Day Inspired By The Art of Wendell Minor

Norman Rockwell Museum Presents Trains! A Family Day Inspired By The Art of Wendell Minor

Norman Rockwell Museum Presents Trains! A Family Day Inspired By The Art of Wendell Minor

Image credit: Wendell Minor, “The Last Train,” 2010. Cover illustration for “The Last Train” by Gordon Titcomb, Roaring Brook Press. Watercolor and gouache on paper. ©Wendell Minor. All rights reserved.

Image credit: Wendell Minor, “The Last Train,” 2010. Cover illustration for “The Last Train” by Gordon Titcomb, Roaring Brook Press. Watercolor and gouache on paper. ©Wendell Minor. All rights reserved.

Norman Rockwell Museum will present the family day “Trains!” on Saturday, November 23, from 1 to 4 p.m. Celebrate trains and the wonders of rail travel during this afternoon inspired by the Museum’s current exhibition, Wendell Minor’s America. Artist Wendell Minor will join us to sign copies of such train-inspired books as “Abraham Lincoln Comes Home” and “The Last Train,” which are featured in his exhibition; the day will also include readings from Larry Lowenthal, author of “Titanic Railroad,” as well as stories about our national rail system from such historians as Jack Trowill, Curator of the Berkshire Scenic Railway Museum, and Alden Dreyer of the Railway & Locomotive Historical Society. Also coming along for the ride is author/musician Gordon Titcomb, who will sing songs about the railway. Support for the program has been provided by Diane Bacha of “Trains Magazine.” The family day is free for Museum members, or with general Museum admission.

Wendell Minor’s America” On view through May 26, 2014

Celebrate the four-decade career of award-winning illustrator Wendell Minor, one of our nation’s premier historical illustrators. Minor drew his way through childhood in Aurora, Illinois, inspired by the richly illustrated magazines that were so much a part of American life during the mid-twentieth century; today he travels throughout the United States to research, draw and paint on location, and immerse himself in the subject at hand. This retrospective looks at the many cover illustrations Minor has created over the years, as well as his 25th anniversary illustrating children’s books, each inspired by his love of history, art, science, and the natural world.

“Wendell Minor’s America” traces the personal and artistic journey of the acclaimed book illustrator and admirer of Norman Rockwell, through original artwork, artifacts, and references from Minor’s expansive visual chronicles, as well as commentary about his collaborations with our nation’s most prominent authors, scientists, and historians; highlights include original work from such books as “Reaching for the Moon” and “Look to the Stars” by Buzz Aldrin; “Sitting Bull Remembers” by Ann Turner; “Abraham Lincoln Comes Home” by Robert Burleigh; “Arctic Son” by Jean Craighead George; “Shane” by Jack Schafer; and “America the Beautiful” by Katharine Lee Bates.

About Norman Rockwell Museum

Norman Rockwell Museum holds the largest and most significant collection of art and archival materials relating to the life and work of Norman Rockwell. The Museum also preserves, interprets, and exhibits a growing collection of original illustration art by noted American illustrators, from historical to contemporary. The Norman Rockwell Museum Art Collection and Norman Rockwell Archive inspire a vibrant year-round exhibition program, national traveling exhibitions, and arts and humanities programs that engage diverse audiences. The Museum’s collections, which are made accessible worldwide, are a comprehensive resource relating to Norman Rockwell and the art of illustration, the role of published imagery in society, and the American twentieth century.

Since its inception, the Norman Rockwell Museum has explored the impact of illustrated images and their role in shaping and reflecting our world through changing exhibitions, publications, and programs. Dedication to a deepened understanding of the art of illustration has led to the formation of the Rockwell Center for American Visual Studies. The first of its kind in the nation, this research institute supports sustained scholarship and establishes the Norman Rockwell Museum’s leadership in the vanguard of preservation and interpretation relating to this important aspect of American visual culture.

Norman Rockwell Museum is located on 36 park-like acres in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, Rockwell’s hometown for the last 25 years of his life. The Museum is open year-round; closed Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day. From May through October, hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily; from November through April, hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekends and holidays. Rockwell’s studio is open May through October, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Museum admission is $16, $14.50 for seniors, $10 for students, $5 for kids, and teens 6 to 18, and free for Museum member, active military personnel, and children 5 and under. Visit the Museum online at www.nrm.org.

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