School News

School News

School News

AMHS students enjoyed their prom at Mt. Anthony Country Club. From left, juniors Jack Lane and Juliana Gabriel, seniors Baily Cross and Gracie Smith, and Prom King and Queen, Parker Blomberg and Jamie Keel.

AMHS students enjoyed their prom at Mt. Anthony Country Club. From left, juniors Jack Lane and Juliana Gabriel, seniors Baily Cross and Gracie Smith, and Prom King and Queen, Parker Blomberg and Jamie Keel.

 

Arlington Memorial High School Ranked Second in Vermont

Arlington Memorial High School (AMHS) has been named a 2018 ‘Best High School by US News and World Report. As part of the magazine’s annual review of high schools across the country, AMHS was named the second-best performing high school in Vermont and was awarded a Silver Medal of distinction.

US News and World Report annually reviews thousands of high schools in all 50 states and the District of Columbia to compile the list. This year the magazine started with 20,548 schools to determine which high schools were most successful at meeting the educational needs of all its students, using standardized math and reading scores, graduation rates, AP test scores and proficiency rates for disadvantaged students. Eighteen Vermont schools made the national list, 14 of which received medals. Stowe High School was ranked the top Vermont high school, earning a Gold Medal of achievement, and like Arlington Memorial, Stowe is the only high school in its supervisory union.

AMHS principal Tim Stewart congratulated students and faculty.

“It’s not the first time Arlington has been named a Best High School, but to be recognized as the number two high school in the state is a great accomplishment. I’m so happy and proud for the students and faculty. It’s a wonderful honor for the entire Arlington community; and as I end my tenure as principal, I’m very appreciative of all of the talented faculty, staff and students who are very deserving of this award.”

LTS Science Department Awarded Grant for Mettawee Research

The Science Department at Dorset’s Long Trail School  (LTS) has once again received funding for the Vermont EPSCoR ‘Basin Resilience to Extreme Events’ research program, which was largely designed to introduce high school students to college-level work. Students in the program are monitoring the Mettawee River at the Cutler Memorial Forest in Dorset and at the Fish and Wildlife site in Rupert.

In June, students Langston Quail of Pawlet and Hope Soucy of Londonderry will join LTS Science Department chair Scott Worland in a residential training week at Saint Michael’s College. The trio will continue stream monitoring efforts in the Mettawee River as part of the Streams Project, as well as develop a new research project to measure the local impact of climate change. The grant will allow them to receive lessons on research techniques relevant to the project, as well as any necessary equipment. They will be collecting data from July through next February, ultimately sharing their findings at the annual Vermont EPSCoR symposium in March 2019. The grant will contribute $1000 to the science department for equipment purchases as well as provide full attendance to the week-long training.

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