Weston Craft Show Celebrates 30th Anniversary

Weston Craft Show Celebrates 30th Anniversary

Weston Craft Show Celebrates 30th Anniversary

One of Lucy Bergamini’s  hand- blown twisted cane vases.

One of Lucy Bergamini’s  hand- blown twisted cane vases.

As the Weston Craft Show, which runs from October 11 through October 13, marks its 30th anniversary at the Weston Playhouse, one of its four founders will be there to mark the occasion.

Glass blower Lucy Bergamini, along with Matthew Perry, and Susanne and Jonathan Horne, plied their crafts in the old Craft Building. The year was 1983, and the four artisans hoped to raise funds to help restore the Old Mill.  It’s thirty years later, and through the efforts of countless determined volunteers, the Mill Building is in the final stages of restoration.  The Mill, the Craft Building and the Farrar-Mansur House are the three museums that benefit each year from funds raised by the Weston Craft Show.

Today Bergamini’s studio is located in a restored barn on a picturesque farm in West Pawlet, where she lives with her daughter and three canine friends.  The day we visited, she and assistant Will Derrico were creating distinctive glasses with rings of vibrant colors. Bergamini creates vessels using an intricate process of blowing, pulling and twisting glass rods or canes with multiple colors entwined.  They are then joined and shaped into desired forms.  She has also created a line of jewelry using a similar process of pulling cane.  The canes are then cut into beads and fire polished, producing gem-like colors. Bergamini joins 44 other top Vermont artisans, including last year’s People’s Choice Award winners Trenny Robb and Bob Michaud of Highbeams in Sutton.  Trenny and Bob handcraft one-of-a- kind, copper and brass lighting.  Lampshades are created using real leaves, petals, mica, fabric, parchment and other natural items.

Also returning this year will be Mary Stone, who creates hand formed musical sculptures in her Montpelier studio, and Faith Fellows, who makes beautiful beaded handbags, marrying Native American motifs with natural imagery.

Matthew Tell creates wood-fired functional pottery in his beautiful hillside studio in Marlboro. This setting influences the earth tone glaze overlays and suggestive landscapes he uses to decorate his pots.  Ellen Spring’s unique hand-painted silk wearables are created using a variety of techniques including resist dyeing, block printing and several immersion dyeing techniques including itajimi shibori.

The Weston Craft Show runs Friday through Sunday from 10 to 5. Admission is $8; parking is free.  All booths are indoors, out of the weather. Luncheon, catered by the Inn at Weston, is available to show attendees at the Café at the Falls.  For more details and a complete listing of our exhibitors and beautiful images of their work visit westoncraftshow.com.

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