Why Conservation in Panama Matters in Vermont

Why Conservation in Panama Matters in Vermont

Why Conservation in Panama Matters in Vermont

A talk on neotropical migrant birds, who spend part of their lives in Vermont, will be held at VINS in Queechee. Photo by Robert Wilson.

A talk on neotropical migrant birds, who spend part of their lives in Vermont, will be held at VINS in Queechee. Photo by Robert Wilson.

Migratory birds such as the warblers, flycatchers and raptors are some of the most enjoyable and anticipated birds to watch during the spring and summer here in Vermont. In fact, these migrants spend most of their lives not in Vermont but in the new world tropics – the neo-tropics – including Mexico, Central and South America. In the rapidly developing economy of the Republic of Panama, logging and land development is causing forest fragmentation and habitat loss. Conservation of land and wildlife that depends on it is made even more difficult due to a lack of public funds and government commitment. Join the Vermont Institute of Natural Science (VINS) on Thursday, September 29, from 7 to 8:30 p.m., for an evening of photographs, sounds and videos of a tropical paradise in danger presented by Ezekiel Jakub, executive director and ornithologist, and Melva Olmos, president and jaguar biologist of Conservación Panamá. Learn about their work in neo-tropical migrant conservation and find out what you can do to help conserve these amazing bird species. A $10 donation is suggested, and will be shared between VINS and Conservación Panamá. VINS is located at 6565 Woodstock Road/Route 4 in Queechee. call 802-359-5000, extension 245, or email info@vinsweb.org to learn more.

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