Artist to Reveal Process Behind Colorizing Historic Photos

Artist to Reveal Process Behind Colorizing Historic Photos

Artist to Reveal Process Behind Colorizing Historic Photos

Bennington Historical Society’s monthly program will be held on Sunday, April 28, at 2 p.m. in the Paresky Auditorium of the Bennington Museum. The program is free and open to the public. Tim Wager’s series of books of colorized historic photographs have been taking Bennington by storm. How does he do it? (hint, it’s not Photoshop). How long do they take? How accurate are they, really? Callie Raspuzzi, collections manager of the Bennington Museum, has been working with the museum’s photograph collection for nearly 15 years. Cataloging and digitizing the museum’s photograph collection has been one of her major accomplishments during that time. Over the past year, she has been working closely with Wager to provide images from the museum’s collection. This project has spurred new research into and surprising information about Bennington’s history. This presentation will describe the step by step process that begins with glass plate negatives and ends up in a fantastical riot of color. Colorizing black and white images is not a new art. This presentation will also include examples of contemporary hand colored images and compare them to Wager’s digital work. We will also look at some historic pieces from the Bennington Museum’s collection that illustrate the actual colors found on the streets of Bennington in the early 1900s.

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