Edward Hopper Biographer, Dr. Gail Levin To Speak at Norman Rockwell Museum

Edward Hopper Biographer, Dr. Gail Levin To Speak at Norman Rockwell Museum

Edward Hopper Biographer, Dr. Gail Levin To Speak at Norman Rockwell Museum

Edward Hopper (1882 - 1967). Cover for Bulletin of the New York Edison Company, (1906 - 1907). Transparent and opaque watercolor, and graphite pencil on paper, Sheet: 10 7/16 x 7 9/16in. (26.5 x 19.2cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest 70.1608 © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by Whitney Museum of American Art. Digital Image © Whitney Museum of American Art.

Edward Hopper (1882 – 1967). Cover for Bulletin of the New York Edison Company, (1906 – 1907). Transparent and opaque watercolor, and graphite pencil on paper, Sheet: 10 7/16 x 7 9/16in. (26.5 x 19.2cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest 70.1608 © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by Whitney Museum of American Art. Digital Image © Whitney Museum of American Art.

Gail Levin, Ph.D., the acknowledged authority on American realist painter Edward Hopper, will present a talk about the artist at Norman Rockwell on Thursday, July 24, starting at 5:30 p.m. The evening lecture is presented as part of the series, “Impossible Craft: The Artist’s Biography,” to be held at the Museum during the month of July.

Dr. Levin is Distinguished Professor of Art History, American Studies, and Women’s Studies at The Graduate Center and Baruch College of the City University of New York. Her many books on Edward Hopper include a four-volume catalogue raisonné (1995), “Edward Hopper: An Intimate Biography” (1995), and “Edward Hopper as Illustrator” (1979); her essay on the artist’s early career as a commercial artist appears in the catalogue for Norman Rockwell Museum’s current exhibition, “The Unknown Hopper: Edward Hopper as Illustrator.” Levin’s biography of Hopper is a basic source for all writing on the artist. Her interest in women artists led to a biography of Judy Chicago (2007) and, more recently, Lee Krasner (2011). Her most recent project, “Theresa Bernstein: A Century in Art”, includes a book, website, and touring exhibition and is the product of her collaboration with several scholars, including her doctoral students at the Graduate Center.

Admission to the evening lecture is free for Museum members, or with regular Museum admission. The event is sponsored, in part, by Carl and Eunice Feinberg.

The Unknown Hopper: Edward Hopper as Illustrator
On view through October 26, 2014

Many noted American modernists have successfully traversed the worlds of fine art and illustration, embracing innovation while satisfying in unique and personal ways the needs and wants of a broad popular audience. “The Unknown Hopper: Edward Hopper as Illustrator” presents a comprehensive study of Edward Hopper’s nearly 20- year illustration career, featuring more than 50 original drawings and paintings by Hopper. These include important works from the Whitney Museum of American Art, through a bequest from the artist’s wife, Josephine N. Hopper; New Britain Museum of American Art; Mead Art Museum; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; and other collections.

Attitudes toward art and the crosscurrents of contemporary commercial society during the early to mid twentieth century will be explored in this exhibition, which seeks to provide an integrated understanding of Hopper’s published and personal art.

About Norman Rockwell Museum

Norman Rockwell Museum holds the largest and most significant collection of art and archival materials relating to the life and work of Norman Rockwell. The Museum also preserves, interprets, and exhibits a growing collection of original illustration art by noted American illustrators, from historical to contemporary. The Norman Rockwell Museum Art Collection and Norman Rockwell Archive inspire a vibrant year-round exhibition program, national traveling exhibitions, and arts and humanities programs that engage diverse audiences. The Museum’s collections, which are made accessible worldwide, are a comprehensive resource relating to Norman Rockwell and the art of illustration, the role of published imagery in society, and the American twentieth century.

Since its inception, the Norman Rockwell Museum has explored the impact of illustrated images and their role in shaping and reflecting our world through changing exhibitions, publications, and programs. Dedication to a deepened understanding of the art of illustration has led to the formation of the Rockwell Center for American Visual Studies. The first of its kind in the nation, this research institute supports sustained scholarship and establishes the Norman Rockwell Museum’s leadership in the vanguard of preservation and interpretation relating to this important aspect of American visual culture.

Norman Rockwell Museum is located on 36 park-like acres in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, Rockwell’s hometown for the last 25 years of his life. The Museum is open year-round; closed Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day. From May through October, hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily; from November through April, hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekends and holidays. Rockwell’s studio is open May through October, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Museum admission is $17.50, $16 for seniors, $10 for students, $5 for kids and teens 6 to 18, and free for Museum members and children 5 and under. Visit the Museum online at www.nrm.org.

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