Nature Notes by Bonnie Dundas

Nature Notes by Bonnie Dundas

Nature Notes by Bonnie Dundas

I measure rainfall here at our house and find we have had 12 inches in July alone. That may explain why our ferns are taller than I am! We planted a hydrangea a few years ago a few feet away from my platform birdfeeder, made specifically to keep the squirrels off. My brother-in-law did a wonderful job on its construction and placed it in cement, where it has stood the test of weather, time, squirrels and most bears. However, the hydrangea has grown to become a handy bridge to the feeder for the squirrels. We have three choices: dig up the feeder and move it, dig up the tree and plant it somewhere else or try cutting it back, probably leaving a big hole in the middle. I guess a fourth choice would be to not feed, but for me, that really is not a choice. The squirrels immediately discovered the ‘bridge’ and invaded, and I miss watching the adult birds introduce their young to the buffet. I put some seeds out this week and many that have been absent this summer showed up: a male red-bellied woodpecker, a pair of white-breasted nuthatches, some care-worn chickadees, a family of cardinals, Carolina wrens and goldfinches. We had six young wood ducks on the pond, each in slightly different plumage. The green heron and great blue heron are visiting the pond and thinning out our frogs and fish. Cedar waxwings have returned as honeysuckle berries start to ripen. The ruby-throated hummingbirds visit flowers and feeder alike. They, and butterflies, are attracted to bee balm (monarda), butterfly bush, butterfly weed (Asclepius), coneflower (Echinacea), lantana and petunia. Diane from East Dorset called to share her sightings of an oriole and a pair of eastern bluebirds. The next time we have clear skies in the evening, go out to see the Milky Way. It arcs across the eastern sky from north to south. I believe as Ralph Waldo Emerson, “Adopt the pace of nature: her secret is patience.” 802-447-7433 or [email protected]